Scheduling – Come one step closer to full productivity

Productivity plan

 

The unicorn of office days: Having a productive day, each day, every day. It’s an admirable goal. It’s a goal we all strive to achieve. A step in that direction is having an efficient schedule. I’m here to help. Let get cracking!

Get the data

Step one in solving any problem is defining it. Try to keep a list of the tasks that need to be done within a given period. I usually find a week to work best. Use whatever you want to get a list of tasks. Forward warning, this might take some time and some trial and error to get used to. Some apps that I find useful when collecting tasks are:

  • Todoist – I use this to keep track of small tasks, repetitive tasks and reminders. I also use this as an idea bank to keep track of ideas before I get back to them and turn them into something more useful.
  • Trello – I use this to keep track of bigger projects. I find Trello boars offer a nice way to keep on top of multiple ongoing projects. If you’re anything like me, you have your work and then a couple of ongoing personal projects you need to deal with.

Disclaimer: There are the tools I’m using, and they seem to work fine for me. However, I must warn you, finding the right tool is a process. You will most likely need to try a couple of alternatives to find the one that works best for you.

A couple of alternatives might be: google tasks, google keep, your favorite calendar app.

Arrange the data

Do not underestimate the power of a well thought schedule. In computer science there is a concept called context switching. It’s the list of operations that the CPU needs to do to move from one task to another. They’re not processing the task, they’re the overhead needed to move from one task to another. Doing that to often can be a problem. You can spend more time switching between tasks than doing actual work. Our brains are not that different. To switch between tasks you need a long time. More so, you have to spend a lot of mental effort to do so. Why not try to minimize that?! Group similar tasks together! You have  a bunch of meetings you need to schedule ? Bundle them all together, so they don’t interrupt your other work! Need to do some paperwork for the week? Do all the paperwork in one day. It will be a boring day probably, but once you get that out of the way, you can focus on your other tasks. More so, you have the bonus that you don’t have to think about paperwork.

Remember, it’s your schedule and it should be custom tailored to you. You know yourself best. I find that certain times of the day work best for certain types of task. For me, morning works best for intense, focused work, so I try to reserve big blocks of time to code early. In the afternoon, I don’t seem to have that much energy left, so I try to do my more mundane tasks: reports, meetings, planning etc. Try out different things to find out what works best for you!

Give yourself some wiggle room

Things happen. More often than not, those things cause delays in your schedule. This is normal. Unknowns cause delays. Keep this in mind when designing your schedule. Meetings run late. Tasks take longer than expected. So many things can go wrong. Part of the purpose of the schedule is to isolate those issues so that they don’t affect other tasks. Some takeaway here could be: don’t put meetings that can run late just before meetings that cannot start late. Find out what the important tasks are and deal with them early (so that you have a bit of time for the tasks to run late)

Tinker with the schedule

A schedule is not a one-time job. It’s living creature, it grows, it evolves. It’s aliveee! Every one in a  while, review your schedule. Who knows, maybe there is something you can improve. Try out some different ways of scheduling, see which one works best for you. It’s your little world. You can do anything with it.

Do you have any more tips on how to build a nice schedule ?

Things to do when you’re not writing code

programmer at work

If you’re reading this, I assume most of your hours are spent staring at an IDE, coding away. What about the times when you’re not building shiny new features. If you’re lucky enough, then you’re going to have a couple of hours of free time every now and then. What should you use that time for ? So many possibilities. If you want to become a better programmer, then these few hours can be incredibly valuable. I’m here to help you get the most out of that time.

Tinker with your process

This assumes you have a process you follow through your day. If you don’t have a process, build one. A good starting point is the organization process It doesn’t have to be perfect. It’s not going to be perfect. That’s OK. A good process should be a checklist you go through for every piece of work.

What makes a process useful is that it can be improved. So start with something, anything. Now think about your process. Did you miss anything lately? Did you break anything? Does your work take longer than expected ? Did you find yourself waiting for others for extended periods of time? These are all questions you should ask yourself, and improve your process to prevent that! Sticking to a process is hard work, however, it’s worth it!

Read around

Reading is an important part of your work. You should not underestimate the value of information. The world of programming is in constant shift. New frameworks, patterns and technologies emerge every day. If you want to be a good programmer, you should keep yourself up to date with the latest trends. The best way to do that is to read around.

You should, at least, read about the frameworks you’re using. Become a guru on the frameworks you’re using. Look at the documentation. How is everyone else using that framework ? Is there anything you can learn from them ? Reading the source code can be incredibly valuable at times. Take your pick, but get to work!

Think about dependencies

What is the next thing you’re going to work on and why ? More than once, I have started on a ticket only to find out there are hidden dependencies required, assets that I needed (which take forever to track down and acquire).  Think about the next piece of work and the following ones. Is there anything you should do now to save yourself some time in the future ? There are lots of little things that have the potential of costing you lots of time later down the road. The earlier you think about them, the easier your life is going to be. And who doesn’t like an easy life?!

Think about potential issues

The hallmark of a good programmer is the ability to think about the bigger picture, not just what you’re working on at the moment. How does what you’re working on now fit into the whole project? Is the work you’re doing now going to cause any integration issues. I’ll give you a spoiler: Most of the problems with software can be found at the joints. What external services does your ticket (and project for that matter) depend on ? What happens if that service is down, or slow, or wrong or any of the myriad of possible ways of things to go wrong with a service. Catch them early and not only you’ll save yourself a headache (and possibly an embarrassment when the project goes live) and you will prove yourself as an awesome programmer. Two birds with one stone.

In conclusion, if you find yourself with some time on your hands, don’t waste it, use that time to improve yourself, like a knight sharpening its sword before a battle (I always wanted to say that!). Thse thins are valuable in the long run. Instead of stealing some moments whenever you have them, try to make them. Take a break from writing code and improve yourself. You’re going to be better at it! Your project is going to benefit! Everybody wins!

What do you usually do when you have a bit of free time on your hands ?

L.E. As with everything in life, common sense should prevail. This does not mean you should drop important work when important work needs to be done, nor does it mean you should completely abandon your other hobbies and focus on programming 24/7. If you need a break from work, you should take a break!