The tells of good feedback

So, what makes a good feedback ? I know there are a lot of articles out there about this, but that doesn’t stop me from giving my two cents, so bear with me.
Weather you’re giving feedback or receiving feedback, I find there are some attributes that make some feedback’s better than others.

Actionable

The purpose of feedback is to help someone improve. If the person receiving the feedback has no idea what they can do to improve themselves, then the feedback is like a bald hedgehog (pointless). If you want meaningful feedback, then it should refer to specific actions the person can take to improve themselves, which leads me to the second point:

Concrete

You’ve all hear it: You are doing perfect, keep it up! (followed by a warm pat on the back). This is useless! First of all: I have no questions that you are an overall great person, but, whoever you are, there is no chance that you cannot improve! And second (and this is more to the point): What am I supposed to to with that information ?! Where do I go from here ?! Certainly there are some things that I am doing better than others and I would like to keep doing more of those. Feedback should focus on concrete facts. Even if you are a superstar and you are good at everything you do, there must be some aspects of your work you could be great at, so try to focus on those.

Short

This one may sound a bit off at first, but feedback should be short. You do not want a laundry list of items on your feedback. We are not good at multitasking (regardless of what you might think), so focusing on a lot of things is just not going to work. For feedback to be truly useful you should find a few points that you can improve upon. I would recommend 3 or 4 key points so you can focus on those. If you tend to get a lot of items on your feedback list, it’s probably a sign you should have feedback chats more often.

Measurable

This one is sort-of dependent on the type of feedback you are getting, so it might not apply in some cases. It feels good to know you are making progress, and it’s useful to know when you are not, so why not have that information available for you to judge. This is easy if the feedback is accompanied by some kind of metric.

And now for the fun bit! Here are some examples of feedback that can be improved upon (granted there are a bit extreme examples, but I trust you’ll get the point)

  1. “I liked your presentation! It was wonderful! You should do more presentations like that! ” versus “I liked your presentation! It was the graphics that I liked the most! They really help get the point accros! Keep doing those!” 
  2. “That meeting went bad! The clients are not happy with us! We should change that on the next meeting!” versus “The meeting went bad! We went in there unprepared and we were not able to address their questions! On the next meeting we should make sure we fully understand the requirements before the next meeting.”
  3. You have been missing your deadlines lately. You should focus more on being on time.” versus “You have been missing your deadlines lately! Can you think of anything that takes time necessary so you can remove those ? “

 

 

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How to deal with issues in production – the short version

Okay, imagine the following scenario: You’re happily going about your day, coding away, without a worry in the world, and then this hits you: “There is something wrong with the production app” (well, maybe not this exact message, but you get the idea). What do you do?! How do you go about fixing the problem and go back to your everyday life?

1. Calm down

Yes, things are bad at the moment. However, this is not the time to lose your head and run around with your hair on fire. You need to have a clear mind in order to focus on the problem and easily find the solution. Go to your happy place and come back when you are ready to get to work.

2. Calm down some more

If you are anything like me then you probably are not calm enough to think clearly. You should calm down some more.

3. Investigate the issue and understand it

OK, now we are ready to start doing something about the problem. The first step is to understand the root cause of the issue. Maybe someone deployed something they shouldn’t have, maybe the data became corrupted or maybe, and this only happens once in a blue moon, maybe there this is just a misunderstanding and there is no issue at all, in which case: Congratulations, you solved it.

At the end of this stage you should be able to at least answer the following question: When exactly does this happens ? 

4. Estimate the impact

Now that we know when the issue occurs, we can start thinking about who does this issue affect. A quick and dirty estimation should be enough. Some useful classifications are: critical (everyone is affected and everything is broken), medium (there is some impact, but the project will probably survive), low (this issue affects only a handful of clients/users), minimal (yes, there is an issue, but unless someone looks really, really hard they’re going to miss it).

Based on the impact of the issue you need to decide if you should fix this now, or later.

At the end of this stage you should be able to at least answer the following question: How bad is it ?

5. Calm down some more

OK, things are starting to clear up a bit now. You know what the problem is and how bad it is. Take a deep breath, decide when this needs to be fixed: either now or later.

6. Track down when the issue was introduced

If you use a versioning system (if you don’t you really, really should), use that to track down the commit that caused the issue. Look trough the code and use a sandbox environment (if any available) to figure that out.

At the end of this stage you should be able to answer the following question: What is the exact cause of the issue ?

7. Fix the issue

Now that you know what causes the issue you are in the best position to start fixing it, so go do it, be a hero and save the day.

Congratulations!! You fixed it!  You can go back to your happy life – crisis averted.

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