Be a more productive coder – Some metrics you should use

What does make a good coder ? Is it the number of lines of code they write in a day ? How about the number of works they put in the office? Maybe it’s how fast they code, how quickly they solve any given issue? Well, as you might have guessed by now, I don’t fully agree with any of these statements. Here are some metrics that better reflect your proficiency as a  code writer.

Is your code easy to understand

You should always write readable code. I have an article here if you need a more in-depth opinion on what good code means. Being a productive programmer it’s not just about you. Your part of a team, a team of programmers who need to spend time understanding, maintaining and changing your code. If you have to spend a few more of your minutes to spare a few more minutes of some of your teammate’s time, then you have made the whole team more productive. Neat, isn’t it?

Forget the clever hacks and neat tricks you are tempted to use. I know, it’s hard to give up on a clever little idea you have. It happens to all of us, all the time. When it makes the code hard to read, it’s probably not worth it.

Is your code correct

This should be pretty obvious: Don’t write bugs. What it’s not obvious, however, it’s how costly bugs actually are. Tiny, little bugs cause big overheads. The QA need to file a bug report, it needs to be prioritized, scheduled into the current development cycle (call it sprint, or whatever you are using). Someone needs to pause their assigned work and start fixing it. This means they need to get up to speed with the area of the code the bug lives in, write the fix, review, and the QA needs to test it again. When you think about it this way, adding a few more automated tests and spending a couple of minutes manually testing your code doesn’t seem that bad. Am I right, or am I right?

Is your code flexible

To know if you are doing this, just remember what were your feelings the last time you were asked to change something you wrote. If your first though was: Noooo! Please don’t make me do that!!! then you should pay more attention to this. Keep in mind that requirements change all the time, and that the code is something that is constantly evolving. Therefore, you should write the code on the assumption that you will need to change it at some point, because it’s a safe bet you will. If you spend your time wisely now, you will save a lot more time later. Flexible code is an investment in your future productivity.

An important disclaimer here. Don’t overdo this. It’s a fine line between keeping your code flexible and spending waaay too much time preparing for a change that may never happen. If you are unsure, just ask someone. The PM/tech-lead/client should know how likely a change is, hence they should be able to give you the answer if it’s worth doing it. Design patterns are a good way to ensure you’re not overthinking the issue. Use them!

Summary

In the end, it’s not about how many lines of code you can write, neither about how fast you go through this current development cycle. What makes a good coder is how good they prepare their code for the next issue, and the next and so on. Therefore, in the long run, you are way more productive if you spend some time today to make your work easier tomorrow.

Do you know any other useful metrics that a programmer should use?

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